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Old 12-May-03, 07:47 PM   #1
MattlL
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Are Squats and Deadlifts bad for the back?


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Last edited by MattlL; 17-May-03 at 11:00 AM.
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Old 12-May-03, 07:58 PM   #2
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Well, if you think that having a weak muscles supporting your back is good for you, then skip them.

If you are in my camp, then you believe a strong lower back, spinal errectors, lats, rhomboids, etc help keep you back in it's proper position. You should be doing them.

Just don't throw 300 lbs on the bar tomorrow, and you'll be just fine. You have to have pretty bad form to actually blow out a disc.

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Old 12-May-03, 08:10 PM   #3
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Doing them incorrectly is absolutely dangerous.

Doing them correctly is quite the opposite and will result in a strong back.
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Old 12-May-03, 08:29 PM   #4
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Deadlifts
Start with low weight, then gradually increase it as you feel good about applying the load to your buttocks and hamstrings. Focus on shifting the weight to your heels and pushing your butt back some. As you do, you'll notice the pull in your hamstrings. Once you feel that tension, then start to elevate your torso with the weight. Keep the weight relatively close to your legs. Make sure that you keep your back straight and your face looking forward (don't look at your feet or the weights). Controlled and key movements are key ... maintaining form throughout. Keep your abdomen tensed.

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Old 12-May-03, 10:13 PM   #5
MattlL
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Okay I think I basically have the correct form for squats down. I have already tried squatting 135 and could do it about 15 times. Basically just put the barbell on the back of your neck so it rests on your shoulders and squat down, correct?

Deadlifts seem a little more complicated to master the form. This is what I did when I tried them. I used 2 35's on each side. I also used Mix grip after seeing pictures of people deadlifting (anyone know what difference between mix and regular grip is?) I put both hands on barbell, look forward, bend my knees, and pull the bar up with my legs and lower back and then lower the bar with my knees. Is this correct form?
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Old 13-May-03, 12:58 AM   #6
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Here's my advice on the subject find some one who really knows what the hell there doing and have them show you. My back is currently f'ed up (doc thinks I might have cracked the one of the processes off my last vertebre, but I have to get a CT scan to know for sure) and it started by deadlifting and then got much worse when I squated. I know I have good squat form and I thought I had good deadlift form but I guess I didn't (it is possible that the injury happened somewhere else and this just made it actually hurt). Anway cause of the pain and cause the doc said not too I haven't been able to squat, deadlift, or clean heavy in almost 2 months and my back hurts constantly. Long story short, make sure you know what ur doing, or you can be like your dad's friend and suriously screw yourself up. All I know is that once my back gets fixed, whenever that might be, I'm going to start light with perfect form and work my way up.
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Old 13-May-03, 01:20 AM   #7
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they should only be dangerous if you use poor form or a weight too heavy for you to ohandle safely
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Old 13-May-03, 11:27 PM   #8
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I think you shouldn't be asking us --- you should be asking a health pro. Not your family doctor (he or she would probably be too paranoid). A physical therapist might be your ideal consealor.

What I've everywhere is that: if you're physically capable of squatting and deadlifting, do it. If you have bad knees or a bad back, avoid them.

Personally I'd advise against it (even though I have no scientific data to back it up). Having scoliosis and doing squats equals doing them wrong, no mater how hard you work on a perfect form. Placing a barbell on your traps will put pressure directly above your spine.

Here's something I found right now, as I assumed there would be some interesting info on scoliosis on the net:

http://www.hardgainer.com/stuart/ (Stuart McRobert from Hardgainer)

Quote:
Q: I have one leg shorter than the other, and scoliosis too. I've spoken to a few chiropractors now. Some have told me I need a heel raise to even out the imbalance. Another chiropractor told me that this would be likely to cause problems because it would be something my body isn't used to. I can't squat or deadlift symmetrically, and have one quad much bigger than the other. What do I do?

A: I agree that the heel raise may cause problems.

The safest approach, in YOUR case, is to drop the deadlift and the barbell squat. A one-legged squat may be a good choice -- no special equipment is needed, and each leg is trained alone. (Stand on a bench, on one leg, and hold a fixed upright for balance. Squat down on the one leg, and hold a dumbbell on the side of the exercising leg.) An iso-lateral leg press is a good choice too -- each leg has its own resistance to overcome (but while both legs work simultaneously), so leg length differences shouldn't be significant. But there aren't many iso-lateral leg machines around.

I too have scoliosis, and can no longer squat and deadlift, because the asymmetrical form (produced by the scoliosis) triggers off back injury.

For your lower back, I'd recommend back extensions. While not as productive as deadlifts for overall growth, if you can't deadlift safely, the comparison is irrelevant.
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Old 14-May-03, 05:56 AM   #9
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Interesting and constructive perspective, markintosh.
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Old 14-May-03, 02:56 PM   #10
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Old 14-May-03, 03:06 PM   #11
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Yeah well i hurt myself doing squats yesterday because someone bumped me and the bar slipped i pulled a ligament.. no lifting for a week. Do them with strict attention to form and you should be fine.
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