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Old 13-May-04, 02:58 AM   #1
fordlife
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Cereal--What are Good for You? I eat Plain Corn Flakes


Alirhgt People, I have been eating my plain corn flakes for a few months and figured they were good for me. Are they? They do have 24g of carbs and some sugar but according to the nutriton link I found here, corn flakes are good.

I sometimes use a protien shake blended with ice, fat free milk and a banana and poor that over the corn flakes as a meal---very good.

Anyway, I work at a grocery store and can get a deal on some Kellogg's cereal....mainly All Bran, Mueslix, Complete, Craclin Oat Bran, and Gronola with raisins. Mueslix and Gronola both have 40g of carbs so I thought I would pass on those. I was considering All Bran over my corn flakes because I heard the wheat will be better for me in loosing fat.

I also eat oatmeal. Mix it with water and nuke it for 2 minutes and add raisins and atkins 0 cal syrup.

Thanks
RYan

ps. the deal is like 12 boxes for $4.00. Thats pretty good.
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Old 13-May-04, 07:20 AM   #2
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Dry cereals like those in the above are full of anti-nutrients especially the high bran ones, fortified with artificial vitamins, missing the cofactors, and subjected to high temperatures and pressures in the various manufacturing processes which radically denature the proteins. No they are not good for you, but neither is microwaving oatmeal. Of course you can pick between the lesser of two evils, Special K is less bad for you than Captain Crunch.

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Old 13-May-04, 08:03 AM   #3
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Don't Corn Flakes spike insulin like CRAZY? lol High on the GI scale?
Not a good idea. Try All Bran.

You could try my breakfast: 1 scoop whey protein (in water) and 1/2 c oats with three teaspoons of Splenda.
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Old 13-May-04, 08:13 AM   #4
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Total cereal is the best. Escpecially for people who need calcium. :thumbup:
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Old 13-May-04, 10:06 AM   #5
fordlife
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Dont Micro Oats?


Quote:
Originally Posted by CliffStamp
No they are not good for you, but neither is microwaving oatmeal.

-Cliff
What is bad about microwaving oats? They should be boiled instead?

No offense to you all but that really pissed me off. I thought I was doing so well, lost a some room in waste and picked up some more viens in arms. Are all cereals bad because they have been processed? I wil have to check a few of the low Glyceimic websites too. Which ones are ok? When I eat them its typically once a day and less than a cup.

I guess I will just go back to a 100% Whey shake in the morning before lift/cardio, is that good?

How about milk? I use that with my protien shakes? Fat free, that cant hurt. Shakes with water are torture.

I do thank you all for your help. I am just really frustrated being I lost 40 lbs 4 years ago, 197-150 and cant get any abs meaning I have fat---kinda loose skin. Plus I seperated my shoulder and in november---AC Seperation--and cant do bench press, thus watching my chest not develop while my back gets stronger.

Thanks
Ryan

Last edited by fordlife; 13-May-04 at 10:20 AM.
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Old 13-May-04, 10:34 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by trHawT
Don't Corn Flakes spike insulin like CRAZY? lol High on the GI scale?
Yeah an old BB trick is to eat them with a post workout shake to jump start you protein uptake.
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Old 13-May-04, 10:35 AM   #7
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Microwaving foods degrades the proteins and oxidizes the fats. If you pre-soak the oatmeal in an acidic medium over night it both maximizes the nutrient profile and allows cooking in a few minutes on the stove.

It is trivial to make a really decent cereal, just find some grains and nuts you like and mix them. I currently eat something with a base of :

1) brown rice, ground to a flour
2) rolled oats or spelt
3) flax, fround to meal
4) a nut/seed mixture (ground coarsely)

Soak that over night, I usually run two days, with either some natural whey (not the protein powder), but most often a bit of sourdough starter. You can also add lemon juice. Then after cooking (a few minutes to thicken) I add some bananna, but usually some berries.

The above is also far cheaper on a nutrient profile basis than boxed cereals. With minor modifications it also turns readily into a pancake, crepe or waffle mix, and can also be used to make muffins, loaves and even breads.

Milk is solid food, get it as close to RAW as possible, meaning full fat, not homogonized, not pasteurized, and pasture fed. Every step away from that lower nutrition readily.

Getting abs can be problematic, some bust them out readily, most however can find it difficult especially to get the final bottom ones. You may need to actually increase the size of your ab muscles to see them, as otherwise your BF% might need to be extreme to bring them out.

-Cliff

Last edited by CliffStamp; 13-May-04 at 10:38 AM.
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Old 13-May-04, 11:52 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fordlife
What is bad about microwaving oats? They should be boiled instead?

No offense to you all but that really pissed me off. I thought I was doing so well, lost a some room in waste and picked up some more viens in arms. Are all cereals bad because they have been processed? I wil have to check a few of the low Glyceimic websites too. Which ones are ok? When I eat them its typically once a day and less than a cup.

I guess I will just go back to a 100% Whey shake in the morning before lift/cardio, is that good?

How about milk? I use that with my protien shakes? Fat free, that cant hurt. Shakes with water are torture.

I do thank you all for your help. I am just really frustrated being I lost 40 lbs 4 years ago, 197-150 and cant get any abs meaning I have fat---kinda loose skin. Plus I seperated my shoulder and in november---AC Seperation--and cant do bench press, thus watching my chest not develop while my back gets stronger.

Thanks
Ryan
Hey Ford, thing is it's not as simple as just getting low fat or low carb. One of the worst things you can every do to your body is go on a low fat or low carb diet without understanding the reasoning behind them. When I was in college I jumped on the low fat bandwagon and ended up damaging my health because I didn't know about EFA's (essential fatty acids that the body can only get from foods and cause just about every system in your body to degrade if you don't get enough of them). Fat from foods does not make you fat. That is one of the most important things to understand. Extra calories make you fat, and fat from foods happens to have alot of calories. But it is essential that you take in enough fat (usually about 30% of your daily calories but everyone is different).

As far as corn flakes go. No. They are one of the worst things you can eat in the morning in terms of blood sugar. Add milk and bananas which are also high glycemic and you've got an insulin rush followed by a huge blood sugar drop just waiting to happen. All of this tends to promote fat gain. The thing most people don't understand about low carb diets which makes them so dangerous is that it is not about simply restricting your carbs. Unless you're pretty overweight over-restricting your carbs can actually be a bad idea. The theory behind many low carb diets is that when you eat carbs your body produces insulin to move the energy from them into the cells. But the body tends to overcompensate and produce too much insulin. This causes several things to happen. The cells cannot utilize all the energy at once so much of it gets stored as fat. Your blood sugar also drops rapidly as insulin levels rise (the opposite of what you would think eating alot of food or sugar would cause to happen but very true nonetheless). This makes you feel tired which makes your body think it is hungry again and gives you cravings for more carbohydrates. Finally, your body's cells can develop resistance to insulin in response to the huge amounts it is flooded with after a large carbohydrate intake. Over time as your cells develop more and more insulin resistance, less energy will be able to get into the cells, meaning more will be stored as fat. Insulin levels will continue to increase over time resulting in a condition called hyperinsulinemia which can eventually lead to type II diabetes and obesity.

Not all carbohydrates cause this to happen. Some carbohydrates are low glycemic meaning they don't cause much of a spike in blood sugar (and thus insulin) because they are slow digesting. Others are high glycemic because they do cause this large insulin spike. HG carbs are typically sugars, and all refined grains. This makes pastas, white rice, cereals, and sweets some of the worst offenders. Certain foods are notorious for having high glycemic indexes, including most breakfast cereals, bananas, and corn. This makes your corn flakes with milk and bananas one of the worst things you could eat in the morning. (Although frosted Flakes would be worse) I don't care about the health claims people make about Total. Those are made because it is very high in vitamins and minerals. But it is like blending a multivitamin into a bowl of sugar and lard and calling it a health food. (Well not really that bad but you get my point).

The trick to successful low carb dieting is to realize that carbs are perfectly okay as long as you stick to low glycemic carbs. Breakfast cereals which are low glycemic include most high fiber cereals, the new Total Protein, new low carb Special K, and I believe most oatmeals though I may be wrong. Skip the banana by all means (very high GI).
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Old 13-May-04, 12:21 PM   #9
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Milk is low GI, 20-30. In the morning you are likely to be glycogen depleted, so you will rapidly utilize the high GI foods, not a large amount, but it can provide the necessary pre-meal, or first meal before a heavy workout.

If however you were just eating one meal before lunch, and had to wait 3-5 hours before lunch you would want a more balanced meal, specifically one higher in protein and fat to spread out the digestion rate. You could get this quite easily by adding eggs to the oatmeal, or having a side of steak, etc. .

-Cliff
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Old 13-May-04, 12:28 PM   #10
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I begin everyday with a big bowl of Raisin Bran (with 1/2 cup skim milk added) and a 2 scoop protein shake (in water). The perfect meal to jumpstart your metabolism and turn it from a catabolic state to an anabolic one! Has always worked great for me!
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Old 13-May-04, 12:33 PM   #11
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Whole milk would be an ok choice, too. Low on the GI scale, plus you get your fat out of the first meal of the morning. O well. I'll stick to my 1/2 cup oats and 1 scoop whey protein (in water) for breakfast.
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Old 13-May-04, 02:51 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DuncanMcFl

Skip the banana by all means (very high GI).

Do you mean elminate bananas from my diet entirely? Today after my workout I had 1.5 scoops of protein---35g---with ice, non-fat milk and water and a banana all blended and drank it. I think the banana makes that shake thicker and fills me up. I also during an 8 hour shift at the grocery store eat 2-4 bananas with other meats and cottage cheese., is that bad?

Before my workout I had a peice of salmon and cottage cheese.

Corn Flakes, should I stop eating those entirely or just in the morning. I used to do a shake in the morning but now have a little bit more time. I could go back to the protein shake.

Thanks soo much, I am now becoming more knowlegable about what carbs are better to eat. Thanks for answering all my questions

Ryan
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Old 13-May-04, 04:09 PM   #13
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Bananas are very high on the glycemic index scale so yes they can promote large insulin spikes and they should typically be avoided. However there are certain times when it is ok to have some high glycemic foods (in moderation). After a workout is the best time. When you workout with high intensity your body can rapidly use the energy from high glycemic carbs to replenish muscle glycogen and fuel muscle growth. After a workout some high glycemic carbs will actually be advantageous because of the rapid energy demands of your body. As Cliff and Todd pointed out, it also may be acceptable to have a small amount of high glycemic carbs in the morning because muscle glycogen levels will be low after a night's sleep, however I wouldn't overdo it. Also both in the morning, and after a workout make sure you have lots of protein, especially if you're having high glycemic carbs. Protein is vital for muscle growth and preventing muscle catabolism and it will also slow down the digestion rate of high glycemic carbs minimizing the blood sugar/insulin spike. I would cut out the Corn Flakes. They're definate bad news. If you want something very similar to Corn Flakes however I strongly recommend either Total Protein Flakes, or low carb Special K. They're very similar to Corn Flakes but they are low glycemic, high in protein, and in my opinion have more flavor and taste better. If you don't want to cut out the banana, try using half a banana. And try adding a serving of low fat plain cottage cheese (almost pure quality) to add protein and even out the digestion rate.

Emphasizing the glycemic index of foods is one of the smartest ways to keep weight off and stay healthy. It's no coincidence that obesity and diabetes have become epidemics in America and more people are suffering from them than ever before. It is because of all the processed grains and added refined sugar that are absolutely everywhere in our diets. They cause the glycemic indexes to skyrocket promoting such disorders. Our evolutionary ancestors had zero added sugars, and zero processed grains. Our bodies are not wired to handle the blood sugar rollercoaster that today's typical diet constantly subjects it to.
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Old 13-May-04, 05:33 PM   #14
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Eating cerial of any kind in the morning is not a big deal. Even the ones for the kids that are full of sugar are also full of vitamins and minerals that you need.

Some people carry this diet thing to the extreme that they study every single nutritional fact and ingredient about food. Just eat! Health has as much or more to do with exercise then it does diet. I guarantee America could continue to eat what they do now, just start exercising regularly, and health would dramatically improve!

Remember. Your body needs many things, including fat, carbs, protein, and even sugar to carry out normal function. Get plenty of all of those things, and exercise. You will be healthy and will get results. I think you become unhealthy when you become so picky that you basically start depriving your body of needed nutrients. For example, not eating bananas because of a high GI. Bananas are a fruit, one of the things we need more of. I don't see not eating bananas because of a high GI.

I am sure if you studied every kind of food out there you can find something bad about it. At the same rate, I am sure you can find something good about it. Just eat, and exercise and do not worry so much about if the type of cereal you are eating is O.K to eat. If you eat it, and have no problems, then yes, it is O.K to eat. If you eat and and you feel your blood sugar drop suddenly and hour later, then don't eat it. Try another cerial.
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Old 13-May-04, 05:48 PM   #15
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I agree with Chris H here, especially for breakfast, your body will make use of pretty much anything you give it and use it to kickstart your metabolism for the day and switch your body into anabolic mode, from it's current catabolic mode. Your body is literally craving carbs (even simple carbs), and even the most sugar filled cereal will be put to good use by your body. As long as your breakfast fits into your daily calorie intake, there is really nothing to worry about regarding sugary cereals and the exact nutritional values. Give your body some quality protein and then some carbs as well, and it will thank you for it for the remainder of the day (yes, even those Capt N Crunch & Lucky Charms!)!!!

Now, you don't want to go around eating sugary cereals during the day, that is a different story. But you have to realize the state your body is in upon waking up each morning...unless you are deep into your dieting down phase, don't worry about it too much! :

Last edited by Todd; 13-May-04 at 05:51 PM.
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