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Old 14-Feb-03, 12:34 PM   #1
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Glycemic impact of maltodextrin


So does everyone consider maltodextrin to be high or low glycemic impact? I've seen it (as I'm sure everyone else has) on glycemic index lists as 105, but the reasons I ask are...

1) I believe GI is measured by calculating blood glucose elevation (the area under the curve, over fasting baseline) relative to a reference, for two hours following administration of the food. Now if pure dextrose's curve (as GI=100) looks like a fat spike and a dive, any food that raises BG steadily and significantly without triggering a crash could achieve a high GI. Is it possible that MD falls into this category?

2) Does the Dextrose Equivalence of the MD made a difference to absorbtion? If so, do we know what DE of MD was used to yield a GI result of 105? Does anyone know the DE of the MD they are using? (Relation question to anyone how happens to know: does our body have to split glucose down to one-molecule size before absorbing it into the bloodstream?)

3) Many products that include MD as a main carb source effectively claim it is low-GI. Now I do not want to trigger a lot of "don't believe the hype" posts, but consider that if we didn't all see MD as 105 on the GI, "conventional" knowledge would say sure, MD has a low GI because the glucose polymers aren't broken down instantly, wouldn't it?

I'm interested to hear anyone's opinions...
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Old 15-Feb-03, 01:16 PM   #2
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Maltodextrin is a high GI source of carbohydrate. It is simply a string of glucose molecules. This string is easily digested and therefore the glucose molecules are quickly absorbed. Basically, MD acts jsut like glucose. Hence, the high GI and a rapid increase in BG.

Quote:
1) I believe GI is measured by calculating blood glucose elevation (the area under the curve, over fasting baseline) relative to a reference, for two hours following administration of the food. Now if pure dextrose's curve (as GI=100) looks like a fat spike and a dive, any food that raises BG steadily and significantly without triggering a crash could achieve a high GI. Is it possible that MD falls into this category?
Our insulin is what causes the BG to "crash". As BG increases, insulin is produced to regulate the BG. Since MD acts like glucose, insulin will kick in to "crash" the BG back to normal.

Quote:
2) Does the Dextrose Equivalence of the MD made a difference to absorbtion? If so, do we know what DE of MD was used to yield a GI result of 105? Does anyone know the DE of the MD they are using? (Relation question to anyone how happens to know: does our body have to split glucose down to one-molecule size before absorbing it into the bloodstream?)
In performing GI testing, the number of carbohydrate grams is kept equivalent (50 grams). So 50 grams of carbohydrate from dextrose was measured against 50 grams of carbohydrate from maltodextrin. Since they are both ~100% carbs, the test was probably performed on 50 grams of each of them.
Glucose is one-molecule in size. Any other polysaccharides (including MD) must be broken down into single units in order to be used by the body.

3) Many products that include MD as a main carb source effectively claim it is low-GI. Now I do not want to trigger a lot of "don't believe the hype" posts, but consider that if we didn't all see MD as 105 on the GI, "conventional" knowledge would say sure, MD has a low GI because the glucose polymers aren't broken down instantly, wouldn't it?

A food can have MD as its main carb source and still be considered low glyemic (does NOT mean it has a low GI), if the overall amount of carb is low. Drinks like Ultra Pure Protein have only 2-4 grams of carbs, all coming from MD. I have seen some powders that have 2-4 grams of carbs all from MD, too, and they are low glycemic. So even though the carb is high glycemic, the glycemic load (which is the true measure of glycemic response) is low.
To calculate glycemic load, multiply glycemic index by number of carbs and then divide by 100. For foods that have multiple sources of carbs, you must know the amount of carbs from each source and then the glycemic loads can be summed to acheive the total.
If you are looking for good post-workout meals/shakes, include the powders with high carbs from MD. For pre-workouts, include low amounts of MD or just include lower glycemic carbs. Every body is different and we all have different responses to different glycemic loads. If you are looking for a low glycemic meal replacement, I recommend Prolabs Lean Mass Matrix. Carb source is from brown rice, barley, and oat bran...mmmmm!! Hope this helps.
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Old 17-Feb-03, 01:56 PM   #3
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I fear I may have not made myself understood -- you more confirmed what I already know, although you make a good point I hadn't considered in #3...

You obviously understand the GI, so do you see what I mean in #1? If GI is calculated by the area under the curve, it's only partial information... You could have two completely different-looking curves, but that produce exactly the same total area between the baseline and the elevation curve -- therefore yielding the same GI value, right?

The thing about DE is it indicates the length of the glucose polymers of MD -- the lower the number, the larger the chains, the larger the number, the smaller the chains (DE goes all the way up to 100 at which point you have dextrose, not MD). (I think this is how it works.) So what I'm suggesting is, wouldn't the DE make a pretty serious difference to how fast it is absorbed?

P.S. Don't get me wrong, I'm appreciative of any and all replies!
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Old 17-Feb-03, 02:41 PM   #4
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While your observation seems interesting, I pay minimal attention to GI. While I don't ignore it, I consider the fact that the scale is based on such unrealistic dosages that practical meaning is lost. Addtionally, the whole idea of mixing foods with differing GI values in a meal (certainly done more often than not) is not addressed. I go for blends of foods that create flavor and are tantilizing for my tastebuds. Paying attention to relative glucose absorption rates is a consideration, but is not the primary one.
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Old 17-Feb-03, 08:20 PM   #5
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-TDS- , I found some info that seems pertinent to your question. Check it out

www.gojus.com/technotes.htm
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Old 17-Feb-03, 08:43 PM   #6
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Horseman 5, very interesting! I hadn't seen a decent explanation of DE before... So if that information is true, it semi-confirms my idea that MD may not actually spike your insulin immediately, but may still hit you rapidly ramping up through the course of two hours, therefore registering a high-GI score. Will dig around for corroborating information...

Cursor, for the most part I agree -- and I would say it's mostly out of interest and not perceived importance that I pursue these answers. (You're talking to a non-diabetic that purchased a BG meter just to perform my own GI tests! Too bad the meters not accurate enough... ) That said, I would hardly call 50 grams non-fiber carbohydrate in a sitting an unrealistic dosage though?
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Old 17-Feb-03, 09:51 PM   #7
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I use both malto and dextrose in my post work out shake. 40g each.
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Old 12-Aug-11, 09:13 PM   #8
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I am a long distance runner. I am 61 years young and so far this year I have finished 3 trail races of 100 miles length. I almost exclusively use maltodextrin as my fuel during these races. I blend 475 grams of maltodextrin with 25 grams of soy protein, add a heaping teaspoon of cinnamon and the contents of five 1-gram Succeed S-Caps for electrolytes. I add 300 grams of water and mix it all in a blender to produce a thin syrupy product containing 2000 calories. I will consume between 6000 and 10000 calories per 100-mile race depending on the amount of climbing required. According to my heart rate monitor I burn roughly 10000 to 20000 calories in these races depending on the amount of climbing. I use maltodextrin precisely because of its high glycemic index and lack of fiber. I eat very high fiber (lots of vegetables, some fruits, whole grains and lean protein for my normal daily training diet.
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Old 21-Sep-11, 12:19 AM   #9
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SUMMARY

Features of the two types of fat mimetics maltodextrins were investigated. Vegetable fat was replaced by the level of 16.7, 33.3 and 50% aqueous gel, and maltodextrin: Pmdx (potato maltodextrin gels) and WMmdx (waxy maize maltodextrin gel). Without the addition of vegetable fat mimetics used in a control sample. Constant shear viscosity, hysteresis and dynamic moduli were measured semi-solid conditions (30C), while the textural measurements determined in the solid state (20C). Up to 50% replacement of fat with little change in strength could be achieved WMmdx. However, mixtures containing Pmdx expressed in a significant decrease in strength. Replacing fats has caused a sharp increase in dynamic forms, especially WMmdx. Constant shear viscosity was elevated to the replacement level of ≥ 33.3%, and more generally with the WMmdx. Unlike Pmdx, the inclusion WMmdx mixtures did not affect the constant shear hysteresis.

PRACTICAL APPLICATIONS

Edible vegetable fat acts as an ingredient in many foods. In confectionery fillings fat is vegetable fat included to control the texture and spreadability. Confectionery fats typical filling contains 30-35% fat. Because sweets are high in calories, the development of low-fat products with desirable flavor and texture is a very difficult task.

In this article the possibility of hydrated gel particles maltodextrin to replace a certain amount of fat in various foods were studied. Therefore, the rheological properties and texture of mixtures of vegetable fats and different type, content and concentration of the aqueous gel of maltodextrin determined. It was therefore a step towards foods that contain water stabilized by small amount of gelling maltodextrin with rheological properties and texture of conventional foods.
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