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Old 17-Jul-04, 01:31 PM   #1
genEus
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Question

I eat raw oatmeal all the time... is it OK?


I've gotten tired of cooking oatmeal then having to clean up, wash the pot, wash the dish, etc... Now I eat it raw, blending it in a cottage cheese + milk + honey + oatmeal shake...

Sounds ok?
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Old 17-Jul-04, 04:32 PM   #2
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Originally Posted by genEus
I've gotten tired of cooking oatmeal then having to clean up, wash the pot, wash the dish, etc... Now I eat it raw, blending it in a cottage cheese + milk + honey + oatmeal shake...

Sounds ok?
It is fine. Raw oatmeal is very good, and an easy way to make good weight gain shake also. You can always blend it with whey for a quick pre workout meal. :
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Old 19-Jul-04, 08:26 AM   #3
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Raw oatmeal, and most other grains/nuts are high in phytates which bind with essential minerals like calcium, iron, magnesium and remove them from your body, it is like taking an anti-vitamin pill. On top of this they also contain compounds which inhibit digestion, some are stronger than others.

The easiest way to cook it is to pre soak it in an acidic medium, it then cooks very quickly (minutes). Cook it in a small pot, and use a hard plastic scraper to minimize cleaning, and just waste less. If you wanted to be really frugal just eat out of the pot, saves cleaning one dish.

You can also switch to oatmeal cookies / crackers instead of dried oatmeal. After soaking it, then lay it on parchement paper in pancake like dollaps and put it in the oven to dry out.

Cook it softly at ~150 F, turn it once it crisps, and let it dry fully (4-6 hours). Just do it in the evening. Make a large batch once a week.

There is nothing to clean up as the parchment paper can be reused. You can even crumble the cookier/crackers up and add milk if you want to eat them as a cereal.

-Cliff
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Old 19-Jul-04, 10:00 AM   #4
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Hmm. .
Not everyone believes that phytates are a bad thing. Although phytates do bind with minerals, they may actually be preventing the formation of free radicals, thereby keeping the minerals at safe levels in the body. Phytates also have a role to play in cell growth and can move excess minerals out of the body. Stephen Holt, MD, a gastroenterologist and author of The Soy Revolution: The Food of the Next Millennium (M. Evans and Company, 1998), says phytates shield us from dangerously high levels of minerals such as iron. Some animal studies have suggested that phytates stop the growth of cancerous tumors. In Earl Mindell's Soy Miracle, he writes that phytates can bind with minerals that may feed tumors.

Phytates are generally found in foods high in fiber. Since fiber-rich foods protect against colon and breast cancers, it is now thought that they are the protective agent in the fiber. It appears that, by binding minerals in the intestines, phytates inhibit the cancer process, especially when it comes to iron. Iron generates free radicals, and phytates may be keeping the mineral balance at a safe level within the body. Phytates act as an antioxidant. Scientists are beginning to express concern over excess iron in the body for this reason. Excessive iron is also known to increase the risk of heart disease. Even a small amount of phytates in food can reduce iron absorption by half, but the effect is less marked if a meal is supplemented with ascorbic acid, which can also help the absorption of zinc and calcium.

Phytates are also known to help prevent cancer by enhancing the immune system. Phytates may increase the activity of natural killer cells which attack and destroy cancer cells and tumors. By working directly to control cell growth, phytates may be an ideal protective agent against a wide range of cancers, carrying excess minerals out of the body, thereby protecting it from a potential overload. Fiber, along with its associated phytates, also provides benefits by regulating the absorption of glucose from starch.
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Old 19-Jul-04, 10:53 AM   #5
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Iron related problems can indeed be a factor, personally several members of my family have hemochromatosis and have to give blood at regular intervals to prevent excess iron in the blood.

Thus it seems obvious that to them, iron binding foods would be of benefit, this doesn't mean in general you would advocate them, as there are also people with iron-deficiencies who would obviously not want any chelating, and then people who are "just right" and would not want reduced iron either.

However even for those that would want chelating for iron, would they also want magnesium, zinc and calcium bound from the body as well. It isn't like the phytates just seek out iron, they will hit all such minerals.

An arguement can be made for use as a periodic cleansing, or detoxification, as they will also bind with heavy metals like Al, but again just be aware that they hit discriminately.

As for cancer, inositol hexaphosphate is being studied in cancer prevention and treatment, it comes from the *breakdown* of the phytates, which you obtain by traditional soaking / fermenting.

Note as well that many of the cancer fighting properties are shown simply because of the fibre effects, which you still get obviously in the soaked / fermented form, no one would argue against not eating such foods, just eat them correctly prepared. Note as well for example that butyric acid, which comes from the fermentation of wheat bran which is know to be inhibit tumor growth is one of the fatty acids in *butter*.

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Old 19-Jul-04, 11:41 AM   #6
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Originally Posted by Lady C
Some animal studies have suggested that phytates stop the growth of cancerous tumors. In Earl Mindell's Soy Miracle, he writes that phytates can bind with minerals that may feed tumors.
The phytate containing soy foods may inhibit the growth of cancerous cells, as the trypsin inhibitors and hemagglutinin also contained within unfermented soy beans and related products are growth inhibitors - reducing growth of all cells, cancerous or not. The same animal studies identified above such as those performed on infant rats showed that the rodents grew abnormally (stunted growth) due to said antinutrients.

The enzyme inhibitors contained within the unfermented soy products were also found to have caused enlargement and pathological conditions in organs such as the pancreas, including cancer, as shown in Rackis's The USDA trypsin inhibitor study - Qualification of Plant Foods in Human Nutrition 1985

Quote:
Phytates are generally found in foods high in fiber. Since fiber-rich foods protect against colon and breast cancers, it is now thought that they are the protective agent in the fiber. It appears that, by binding minerals in the intestines, phytates inhibit the cancer process, especially when it comes to iron.
Quote:
Phytates are also known to help prevent cancer by enhancing the immune system. Phytates may increase the activity of natural killer cells which attack and destroy cancer cells and tumors. By working directly to control cell growth, phytates may be an ideal protective agent against a wide range of cancers, carrying excess minerals out of the body, thereby protecting it from a potential overload. Fiber, along with its associated phytates, also provides benefits by regulating the absorption of glucose from starch.
As already identified, phytates bind indiscriminately, including the mineral Zinc - a micronutrient essential in maintaining the immune system and reducing the chances of cancerous cells developing. Zinc is also essential for the proper homeostasis of blood sugar levels, thus reducing the chances of diabetes occurring.

A well balanced, natural diet will rarely result in dangerously high amounts of minerals such as calcium, magnesium, zinc and iron accumulating in the body (unless you do have a medical condition that results in iron, copper etc accumulating in your blood). Large population studies have shown that in Third World Countries where foods/ diet aren't/ isn't supplemented or fortified with additional minerals, that high phytate containing foods such as grains and legumes - a staple in such countries - result in mineral deficiencies as the phytates prevent absorption of said micronutrients, as identified in Tiney's paper Proximate Composition and Mineral and Phytate Contents of Legumes Grown in Sudan - Journal of Food Composition and Analysis 1989, and also Ologhobo's Distribution of phosphorus and phytate in some Nigerian varieties of legumes and some effects of processing - Journal of Food Science - 1984.

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Last edited by B.A.; 19-Jul-04 at 11:54 AM.
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Old 19-Jul-04, 11:55 AM   #7
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Very interesting stuff, indeed... Are there defined limits to what one shall eat? Like, I probably don't eat more than half a cup a day total of raw oatmeal, total. When I used to cook it, it'd be more like one or two cups a day...
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Old 19-Jul-04, 12:55 PM   #8
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How much you can eat is individual as you can make phytase in the intenstine which is the enzyme which breaks down the phytates. People have different abilities here, just like some people make very little lactase and thus are lactose intolerant.

What happens on a high phytate diet is that you become deficient in calcium, magnesium, zinc, etc., it takes a long time for the symptoms of such a diet to actually manifest themselves, and by the time they do (such as low bone density) it can be problematic to reverse.

The question I would ask is why pose a strain on your body that you don't need, in our current enviroment it is nearly impossible to avoid toxins (just consider the air) in what you eat and are exposed to, not to mention the various diseases, why eat something that is going to make you weaker if you don't need to.

Just consider if you had a simple inhaler, which is free and when you took a puff of it went into your lungs and cleared out all the toxins, would you not want to take that and take a shot daily.

Even if you don't smoke, you still get a lot of crap down there, and even if your body can handle it, why put stress on your immune system that you don't need.

Soaking / fermenting besides neutralizing phytates, tends to in general raise the nutrition of foods greatly, especially if they are sprouted.

Yes it takes time, but so does exercise.

-Cliff
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Old 19-Jul-04, 01:40 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CliffStamp
The easiest way to cook it is to pre soak it in an acidic medium
I am interested in this - you got any suggestions for what medium?
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Last edited by Jakanden; 19-Jul-04 at 02:54 PM.
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Old 19-Jul-04, 02:38 PM   #10
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If you are eating raw oatmeal take it with lots of fluid. The high fibre content swells in water which is why it is so good as a bulking agent, without adequate fluids it will become cement like in the intestines and cause severe constipation with time.
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Old 20-Jul-04, 07:54 AM   #11
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The optimal media is a small amount of active whey (not the powder the liquid), next would be fresh squeezed lemon juice, the active vingegar (not pasteurised). You can also use a sourdough culture.

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Old 20-Jul-04, 11:36 AM   #12
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Thanks - I will have to give that a try =)
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Old 20-Jul-04, 12:15 PM   #13
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Note the texture and taste varies a lot. Rolled oats when heavily cultured take on a consistency like glue, and they taste similar. The first time I tried it I thought I was eating a bowl of cement. Rolled spelt is many times nicer. They both undergo a significant change if you bake the cooked oatmeal and dry it out. They actually taste quite good then.

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Old 20-Jul-04, 03:59 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bb1fit
It is fine. Raw oatmeal is very good, and an easy way to make good weight gain shake also. You can always blend it with whey for a quick pre workout meal. :
what's the calorie/fat/protein/carbs on that shake?
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Old 26-Nov-09, 01:48 PM   #15
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