Go Back   Discuss Fitness > Bodybuilding > General Bodybuilding

General Bodybuilding Forum for intermediate and experienced bodybuilders to learn and give advice.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 04-Jan-07, 11:45 PM   #1
MAURER
Dr. Huge
 
MAURER's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: NJ
Age: 25
Posts: 2,223
Send a message via AIM to MAURER

Career In Training


Hey guys, I'm a freshman in college and I really would like to be a personal trainer, athletic trainer, or something along those lines. I was wondering if anybody on here has pursued a similar career and how they recommend I go about being successful.
MAURER is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-Jan-07, 08:44 AM   #2
maverick
missin the gym
 
maverick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Pittsburgh
Age: 33
Posts: 3,208
MostMuscle is currently a trainer, I think SarahPT is as well. You migh want to ask them specifically. There's probably also posts on this site about this exact subject if you search.
maverick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-Jan-07, 09:27 AM   #3
Eric_B
Registered User
 
Eric_B's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Rochester, NY
Posts: 699
As long as you are first-aid/cpr certified, you can take the American Council on Exercise (ACE) Personal Training certification test. The same prerequisites apply for the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA) Personal Training test. MostMuscle recommended the NCSA-PT cert when I asked him. If you are looking for part-time work during college, I think either of them would be acceptable. There are more prestigious certifications, but they are not available until you earn a degree in the exercise sciences.
__________________
NSCA-CPT
Goal for 2008: Stay Lean, More Power!
January 2007 Bodyweight: 202 lbs.
Current Bodyweight: 158 lbs.
Eric_B is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-Jan-07, 10:47 AM   #4
The Flash
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 268
I think you should try and get certified in as many areas as possible to enhance your resume. Also, start looking now. Talk to people in the gym you go to or local gyms. I know at my old gym, they've taken on some of the members to be part-time trainers when they have absolutely no business training anyone. It wouldn't hurt to ask and it would be a foot in the door and great experience. Also, talk to people who are already trainers and pick their brains. I know you will have to take a lot of "science" related classes to learn about the body, etc.
The Flash is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-Jan-07, 01:17 PM   #5
Blaze
Registered User
 
Blaze's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 858
http://www.discussfitness.com/forums...highlight=nsca

Check the link. Most Muscle helped me when I was looking for this info. I am currently taking a class to study for the NSCA-CPT test....scary, but exciting.
__________________
Bigger, Stronger, Faster...Eat hard. Eat harder. Sleep hard. Sleep harder. Lift hard. Lift harder...And then lift harder than that.
Blaze is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-Jan-07, 12:43 AM   #6
MAURER
Dr. Huge
 
MAURER's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: NJ
Age: 25
Posts: 2,223
Send a message via AIM to MAURER
thanks for the tips guys. do any of you guys know what kind of college degree i could get in excercise sciences and where that might take me?
MAURER is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-Jan-07, 01:12 PM   #7
SarahPT
Registered User
 
SarahPT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Maine
Posts: 189
Hi there,
I'm a certified personal trainer and sports nutritionist, and I own my own business. I got my PT cert through ACE (which someone posted above) and my sports nutrition through a similar program of studying on my own, then taking a lengthy exam. I went to college, but for nothing related to this. So I can't answer anything about that.

If you want to work in a gym, you might want to look around at some local gyms for ones you find interesting. Find out what qualifications the trainers there have.

Starting your own business is a whole other thing. I've been at it for 3 years and I have a long ways to go. It's hard. You have to constantly promote yourself. I like the route I've chosen though. I really like the fact that I'm qualified to work with people on both their nutrition and exercise, so they can be the most successful.

Good luck!

Sarah
__________________
www.sarahpersonaltraining.com Training those who want to achieve big things

My fitness and nutrition articles are here http://www.helium.com/user/show/202645
SarahPT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-Jan-07, 08:46 PM   #8
MostMuscle
Site Moderator
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Sunny Tampa, Florida USA
Posts: 321
Send a message via MSN to MostMuscle
Quote:
Originally Posted by MAURER
thanks for the tips guys. do any of you guys know what kind of college degree i could get in excercise sciences and where that might take me?
Summary of human performance related degree areas:


Exercise Science/Exercise Physiology- Sets you up for possible careers in Strength & Conditioning, Cardiac Rehab, Fitness & Wellness, Corporate Fitness, and Personal Training. Some use it as a stepping stone to other fields such as Podiatry, Biomechanics or even MedSchool. You learn why and how the body responds to exercise and learn how to program for special populations. I am most familiar with this as this is what I have.

Sports Medicine/Athletic Training- Preps you to become an ATC which is the guy/gal you see running onto the field when an athlete gets hurt. Main focus is on injury prevention and rehab. You will get to the anatomy of the human body by heart and be able to identify specific (VERY specific) parts on the body with ease. Taping techniques and all the different rehab modalities will be perfected (from simple R.I.C.E to ultrasound etc). Demanding major as you should plan to spend a great deal of time in the training room or on the field before and after each game and practice. Many continue on to PT school (more $$$ better hours). This was my original major but soon realized I did not have a healing touch .

Physical Education- Focuses on teaching and coaching techniques. You learn a little about everything as far as physiology and injuries, but the main focus is on teaching, education and motivations. Pass the teaching exam and you are ready to teach in schools or even pursue a coaching career (usually requires a Masters).

Sport Management- A bachelor's degree in Sport Management will prepare you for a broad range of careers and enable you to focus on your particular area of interest, such as sport administration, sport marketing, or risk management. Career paths include: managing and marketing professional and collegiate athletic organizations or resort establishments, owning and managing a sport-related business, or operating recreational programs in municipalities or leisure/tourism settings.

Sport Psychology- This is a new field that I am considering getting into. Sport and Exercise Psychology can provide you with the basis for understanding the thought processes and attitudes of athletes and individuals involved in sport or exercise activities. With this understanding, you can then learn to help others improve their performance and/or psychological well-being. Basically, work with athletes and general population to help with mental aspects of physical performance or eating habits etc.
MostMuscle is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-Jan-07, 07:47 AM   #9
Dan C
Registered User
 
Dan C's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Baltimore
Posts: 1,322
Nice summary MM! I would just like to elaborate on the Athletic Training degree and how the name is SO misleading.

As an ATC, you do not train athletes! Like he said, it's mainly prehab and rehab, but as my Care & Prevention professor told me, ATC's do everything from apply band-aids to shave feet! (Yes, callous build up on the feet needs to be shaved off and if they athlete is too lazy to do it himself, it's your job!)

I almost got into Athletic Training myself, but fortunately could not commit to full-time program. It wasn't until later when I realized just how misleading the term "athletic trainer" was.
Dan C is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-Jan-07, 10:31 AM   #10
Khaine
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Bergen, Norway
Age: 29
Posts: 518
Send a message via MSN to Khaine Send a message via Yahoo to Khaine
Great info MM... Appreciated...
Khaine is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-Jan-07, 10:53 AM   #11
judo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 235
the national council of strength and fitness is from my opinion is cheaper and you don't need a degree in science. check it out.
judo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-Jan-07, 11:16 AM   #12
Dan C
Registered User
 
Dan C's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Baltimore
Posts: 1,322
Truth be told, most clients you might have as a personal trainer have no idea between the different certifications. Most don't even ask. However, your "peers" know the difference between the cheaper certifications and the better ones.
Dan C is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-Jan-07, 11:41 AM   #13
LINDA
Registered User
 
LINDA's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: N.M.
Posts: 5,201
You should decide what kind of environment you want to work in and what kind of people you want to be working with.

Do you want to work with young athletes or perhaps the average Joe or even seniors, healthy or not?

My first thoughts when I hear "personal trainer" make me think of overly educated and underemployed young people hawking gym memberships because it's a cool sounding job title. The whole profession needs a makeover to separate the real deal from the glorified snakeoil salesmen.

The science of sports, health and fitness is unlimited in opportunity and I do believe it's a great time to be involved. There are lots of niches in the industry to be filled.
__________________
GYM
LINDA is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-Jan-07, 12:34 PM   #14
Blaze
Registered User
 
Blaze's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 858
I'm studying for my NSCA cert right now and I agree with Brat. Many people like to say they train people or are capable of training people. But half the time their provoking injury or something of the ilke without knowingi it.

And if asked to explain WHY to do this excercise or that one, they simply shrug in confusion. They know what brings results, but can't understand applied sciences. Thats the key.
__________________
Bigger, Stronger, Faster...Eat hard. Eat harder. Sleep hard. Sleep harder. Lift hard. Lift harder...And then lift harder than that.
Blaze is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
average joe, body responds, currently taking, exercise science, gym membership, human body, local gym, personal trainer, personal training, sports med, sports medicine, sports nutrition



Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Sitemap:1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28
Sponsor Our Community

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:40 PM.


vBulletin ©2004 Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
©2004 DiscussFitness.com