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Old 26-Jul-04, 11:37 AM   #1
genEus
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Question

Rest between reps? (Squats, specifically)


I find that I can't do heavy squats without taking a break after each rep, about 5 to 10 seconds. I haven't experienced the same with any other exercises because in the case of squats you can actually recuperate, whereas with something like the bench press you're just taxing your triceps, not resting.

In any case, is it ok? More beneficial? Less beneficial?
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Old 26-Jul-04, 12:10 PM   #2
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I would say you should keep the weight moving at all times, but if you have to rest, rest for a few seconds at the top of the movement, catch your breath, and then begin your decsent immediately.
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Old 26-Jul-04, 03:56 PM   #3
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this sounds like it lowers the intensity quite a bit. by resting at the top it would be relieving the tension on the legs which lowers the overall intensity of the excersize (need tension at all times for full intensity). maybe lower the weight?
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Old 26-Jul-04, 09:11 PM   #4
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I would have thought that even when resting at the top of the movement when squatting you are still taxing you body, may just not be as noticable as when resting while benching.

I dont know if there is a right or wrong answer to this but I find keep the weight moving or only rest for like maybe 1 sec then keep the exercise going, you may find you will have to decrease weight slightly to do this, but I think you might get a better workout for your legs.
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Old 27-Jul-04, 05:59 AM   #5
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Why I'd been OK with doing this (with really heavy weight only, though) is because taking the concept of Maximum Overload a bit further (Todd), if you take 2-3 minute breaks between sets in order to lift your heaviest the next set, why not take tiny 5 second breaks between reps, if you then maximally overload your muscle on the next rep as opposed to just dropping the weight and being able to squat faster, but fatiguing the muscle more than overloading it? Makes sense at all?
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Old 27-Jul-04, 07:09 AM   #6
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Hmmm. When I go heavy on squats, I pause for up to 3 seconds at the top of the movement to prepare for the next rep. Am I better off going lighter and cutting the "rest" periods down?
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Old 27-Jul-04, 12:57 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by genEus
Why I'd been OK with doing this (with really heavy weight only, though) is because taking the concept of Maximum Overload a bit further (Todd), if you take 2-3 minute breaks between sets in order to lift your heaviest the next set, why not take tiny 5 second breaks between reps, if you then maximally overload your muscle on the next rep as opposed to just dropping the weight and being able to squat faster, but fatiguing the muscle more than overloading it? Makes sense at all?
Taking 5 second breaks between reps only serves to take continuous tension off the muscles and fails to overload them in an efficient manner. The execution of squats and any other exercise should be done efficiently as possible....and this means performing each rep under control, using a full range of motion and keeping the tension/stress continuous.

You have to ask yourself....do you pause for 5 seconds or more at the top or bottom of the movement when doing curls, skull crushers, shoulder presses, or any other movement? If so, then most likely you are taking important muscular tension out of the muscles and placing it onto the joints. It's important to keep the weight controlled but moving at all times.
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Old 27-Jul-04, 08:54 PM   #8
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Todd, is conventional deadlifts an exception to the continuous tension thing? We had a discussion on here not too long ago about how deadlifts may be one of the only exercises that don't have an eccentric part to it...but others disagreed.

So, if you set the weight down, is that wrong? When i do deadlifts, i set it down completely, then go again. Sometimes i take up to 5 seconds between lifts, but i try not to take more than maybe 2 seconds on my heavy sets. On a warmup set there is no rest between the reps lol .

Curious on what you think about that.
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Old 27-Jul-04, 10:57 PM   #9
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There is one major flaw that is repeated continuosly in this thread (among others). It is that there is only one correct way of working out. No matter how long you have been lifting, how many degrees you have, or how many shows you have won, you cannot tell me what works best for my body. What everyone here has is theories. What this board is for is to share those theories in hopes that they will help someone else.

In this case, my theory is that if you are going heavy, trying to do a maximal lift, or just going for limited reps, then its okay to rest at the top of a rep. On the other hand, for higher rep workouts, then yes you would want to keep a constant tension on the muscle because you are going more for muscular endurance.
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Old 27-Jul-04, 11:15 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Josephina
this sounds like it lowers the intensity quite a bit. by resting at the top it would be relieving the tension on the legs which lowers the overall intensity of the excersize (need tension at all times for full intensity). maybe lower the weight?
You do not need to have continuous tension for growth. Cumulative fatigue is what matters.
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Old 28-Jul-04, 05:20 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DaRkAnGel
You do not need to have continuous tension for growth. Cumulative fatigue is what matters.
Well, you're from a different point of view alltogether -- is *fatigue* really what matters or is muscle it overload?
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Old 28-Jul-04, 08:01 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by smm3
There is one major flaw that is repeated continuosly in this thread (among others). It is that there is only one correct way of working out. No matter how long you have been lifting, how many degrees you have, or how many shows you have won, you cannot tell me what works best for my body. What everyone here has is theories. What this board is for is to share those theories in hopes that they will help someone else.

In this case, my theory is that if you are going heavy, trying to do a maximal lift, or just going for limited reps, then its okay to rest at the top of a rep. On the other hand, for higher rep workouts, then yes you would want to keep a constant tension on the muscle because you are going more for muscular endurance.
Good post. Yes, there is a textbook way of doing every exercise, but I think we all have learned on this board that different things work for different people. As long as the end result is positive and the execution of the exercise does not put you at risk of injury, do whatever works, eh?
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Old 28-Jul-04, 02:23 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by genEus
Well, you're from a different point of view alltogether -- is *fatigue* really what matters or is muscle it overload?
http://www.fortifiediron.net/invisio...ertrophy&st=20

I believe it is. : Pay particular attention to powermandl's posts.
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Old 28-Jul-04, 02:36 PM   #14
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Depends what you define as fatigue really, I belive in mechanical load triggering hypertrophy, as opposed to fatigue.
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Old 28-Jul-04, 03:03 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KetoManiac
Depends what you define as fatigue really, I belive in mechanical load triggering hypertrophy, as opposed to fatigue.
So what you are saying then is that soemthing would have to be increased in order for more hyperotrphy to result?

What if a person didn't necesarily increase either of these but instead expanded his workout into a few more sets and less rest times, wouldn't hypertrophy be the end product?
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